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Why I will not shop at Wal-Mart

This article at FastCompany sums up why I will not shop at Wal-Mart. It is literally backstabbing a business owner. Please take your time and read the article. It’s essential for us to know what is going on, in order to keep our jobs in the future.

Fast Company: The Wal-Mart You Don’t Know” by Charles Fishman

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6 Comments

  1. Looks like the consumer to some degree understands shopping at walmart is tantamount to cutting their own throats. No worries for the walmart lovers out their. I am sure they can figure out yet another way to foist their healtcare costs onto the public. After all, Pal Joey is still in the White House.

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  3. mds-mds mds-mds

    Importing goods from overseas – China, it is just the way it is. Competetion, if you wont do, you can not satisfy masses and make it affortable.

    And then somebody else would. As for the “Vlasic” again, you might consider it as a public service Wal-Mart make affortable for many many people, what deemed to be elitest product.

    It is so easy to follow the falacy and stone walling “American jobs”. Some people could remember there used to be adds on TV where a cowboy was blowing up Japanese cars…it did not help.

    The only way to survive is to switch to high tech, move one. This is just natural evolution. For some things even robots can not compete with 1 USD dollar a day pay….

    • hanseich hanseich

      Hi mds-mds,

      I posted this post over one year ago and my perceptions about business
      have certainly changed. I totally agree that it is competition, and
      competition is good to create ever better service and products. In this
      case though, it seems to be creating more trouble in the long run than
      it does good.

      North Americans (and by that I mean mainly US Americans, not so much
      Canadians) seem to think that they can make themselves happy by
      purchasing ever more garbage at ever cheaper prices. Walmart fulfills
      this “want”.

      I'm not sure where you live, but I do hear about a lot of issues in the
      asian job market, and I am not willing to support the exploitation of
      people. Although I can't avoid it, I will try my best not to promote it.

      I think there are a lot more issues economically with this system
      though. North America has created an ideal environment where are few
      business owners create massive companies and amass a lot of wealth, but
      in essence “funnel” the money out of North Americas market into Asia,
      which will severely hurt this economy in the long run.

      China on the other hand protects its economy. If you want to set up shop
      in China, they make you co-operate with local business' which has to
      own at least 50% of the business. Profit has to be shared between them.
      This means that you cannot simply set up shop and suck the money out of
      the country.

      One last point in this debate, Germany has managed to stay right on top
      of the game. It is really surprising how much is still manufactured in
      Germany and how well they are competing in the world market. This shows
      you that a country can compete even though it has extremely high labor
      cost. (I'm aware of the shifts in the market even there, since I am
      German), but en large, it is coping very well.

      My observation is it that North American business' let their heads hang
      fast, when it comes to manufacturing here. They only care about the
      bottom line and not the health and wealth of their nation. So I like to
      encourage companies to be be as innovative as possible, to stick in it
      for the long run and not simply hand the business over to Asia.

  4. hanseich hanseich

    Hi mds-mds,

    I posted this post over one year ago and my perceptions about business have certainly changed. I totally agree that it is competition, and competition is good to create ever better service and products. In this case though, it seems to be creating more trouble in the long run than it does good.

    North Americans (and by that I mean mainly US Americans, not so much Canadians) seem to think that they can make themselves happy by purchasing ever more garbage at ever cheaper prices. Walmart fulfills this “want”.

    I’m not sure where you live, but I do hear about a lot of issues in the asian job market, and I am not willing to support the exploitation of people. Although I can’t avoid it, I will try my best not to promote it.

    I think there are a lot more issues economically with this system though. North America has created an ideal environment where are few business owners create massive companies and amass a lot of wealth, but in essence “funnel” the money out of North Americas market into Asia, which will severely hurt this economy in the long run.

    China on the other hand protects its economy. If you want to set up shop in China, they make you co-operate with local business’ which has to own at least 50% of the business. Profit has to be shared between them. This means that you cannot simply set up shop and suck the money out of the country.

    One last point in this debate, Germany has managed to stay right on top of the game. It is really surprising how much is still manufactured in Germany and how well they are competing in the world market. This shows you that a country can compete even though it has extremely high labor cost. (I’m aware of the shifts in the market even there, since I am German), but en large, it is coping very well.

    My observation is it that North American business’ let their heads hang fast, when it comes to manufacturing here. They only care about the bottom line and not the health and wealth of their nation. So I like to encourage companies to be be as innovative as possible, to stick in it for the long run and not simply hand the business over to Asia.

  5. hanseich hanseich

    Hi mds-mds,

    I posted this post over one year ago and my perceptions about business
    have certainly changed. I totally agree that it is competition, and
    competition is good to create ever better service and products. In this
    case though, it seems to be creating more trouble in the long run than
    it does good.

    North Americans (and by that I mean mainly US Americans, not so much
    Canadians) seem to think that they can make themselves happy by
    purchasing ever more garbage at ever cheaper prices. Walmart fulfills
    this “want”.

    I'm not sure where you live, but I do hear about a lot of issues in the
    asian job market, and I am not willing to support the exploitation of
    people. Although I can't avoid it, I will try my best not to promote it.

    I think there are a lot more issues economically with this system
    though. North America has created an ideal environment where are few
    business owners create massive companies and amass a lot of wealth, but
    in essence “funnel” the money out of North Americas market into Asia,
    which will severely hurt this economy in the long run.

    China on the other hand protects its economy. If you want to set up shop
    in China, they make you co-operate with local business' which has to
    own at least 50% of the business. Profit has to be shared between them.
    This means that you cannot simply set up shop and suck the money out of
    the country.

    One last point in this debate, Germany has managed to stay right on top
    of the game. It is really surprising how much is still manufactured in
    Germany and how well they are competing in the world market. This shows
    you that a country can compete even though it has extremely high labor
    cost. (I'm aware of the shifts in the market even there, since I am
    German), but en large, it is coping very well.

    My observation is it that North American business' let their heads hang
    fast, when it comes to manufacturing here. They only care about the
    bottom line and not the health and wealth of their nation. So I like to
    encourage companies to be be as innovative as possible, to stick in it
    for the long run and not simply hand the business over to Asia.

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